Medieval Token of Love

Medieval heart-shaped silver brooch acquired by Fife Cultural Trust in 2012 with an NFA grant of £250

Medieval heart-shaped silver heart

Medieval heart-shaped silver brooch

This heart-shaped silver brooch lay underground in Fife for hundreds of years until 2012 when it was discovered by a metal detectorist who reported the find to the Treasure Trove Unit. Under Scots Law objects whose original owner is unknown become the property of the Crown. For archaeological finds this law is used to ensure that finds of cultural significance are allocated to museums for public benefit. The finder is eligible for an ex gratia reward to recognise their contribution. Experts at the Treasure Trove Unit identified the brooch as a medieval love token, perhaps given by a husband to his wife. The reverse is inscribed ‘+ihesus nazren’, an abbreviation of the inscription ‘IHESUS NAZARENUS REX IUDEORUM’ which was often inscribed on jewellery in the belief that it would protect the wearer from harm.

Similar brooches dating from the 15th century have been found but this brooch is unusual in dating from the previous century. Brooches of this type are decorated with floral designs and engraved on the back. Examples from the 15th century have French inscriptions but this example has Lombardic lettering. The style of the brooch pin is similar to others from this date with a bar and collar resembling the hilt of a sword.

In 2013 the brooch was claimed as Treasure Trove and offered to museums in Scotland for their collections. Fife Cultural Trust made a successful bid and the brooch was added to the collections with the help of a grant from the NFA. It is now on display in Moments in Time, the local history exhibition at Kirkcaldy Galleries which opened in June 2013.

Jane Freel
Museums Curator
Fife Cultural Trust

http://www.onfife.com/

Treasure Trove Scotland

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